Immunization Awareness for Seniors

  •  AgePeople aged 50 and over are in a higher risk category for pneumococcal pneumonia; however, age is not the only risk factor to determine if you should be immunized. This risk assessment is a quick, easy and free way to determine not only IF you should be immunized but help you determine where. 
  • Immune System – Having a decreased immune system puts you at risk of certain health problems and diseases. As we age our immune system becomes less effective at protecting us from certain illnesses and creates a need for age related immunizations such as flu, shingles, and pneumonia.
  • Chronic Health Problems – If you have certain chronic health issues such as COPD, diabetes, heart conditions, auto-immune diseases, arthritis, or other age related health problems it’s important to be immunized against certain diseases. In today’s modern world we have the medical technology to decrease your risk for getting a number of diseases that can cause illness or even death.
  • Healthy Lifestyle – Following a healthy lifestyle can decrease your risk for a number of diseases. A healthy lifestyle includes eating healthy, not smoking, and trying to remain active.

Immunization Awareness for Seniors

Your immunization schedule depends upon what vaccines you have already received with the CDC recommending this adult immunization schedule.

  • Flu – Recommended as an annual immunization, flu vaccines come in shot form and nasal spray. The flu shot is recommended for anyone 6 months or older and especially important for anyone who has an auto-immune disease, works with the elderly or children, caregivers, and seniors. It is recommended that you get your flu vaccine as soon as it is available in your area, by October of each flu season.
  • Pneumonia – The CDC recommends that seniors get two pneumonia shots. The risk of the elderly getting pneumonia is 10 times greater than those who are not seniors.
  • Shingles – It is recommended that you be immunized as a senior even if you don’t recall having had childhood chicken pox. You can even get the Shingles Vaccine if you’ve had Shingles.
  • Tetanus – Immunization against Tetanus can generally be given at any time during adulthood. It is important to have a fairly recent Tetanus if you experience any type of broken skin injury and will be asked by an attending medical personnel when your last immunization was (usually within 5 years of injury).

It’s important to know your medical record when it comes to being immunized. Immunization awareness month is the perfect time to check your records to be certain you live the healthiest life you can!